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Eco+Envy Guide to Cannabinods

FDA DISCLOSURE

THESE STATEMENTS HAVE NOT BEEN EVALUATED BY THE FDA AND ARE NOT INTENDED TO DIAGNOSE, TREAT OR CURE ANY DISEASE. ALWAYS CHECK WITH YOUR PHYSICIAN BEFORE STARTING A NEW DIETARY SUPPLEMENT PROGRAM.

What do Cannabinoids do?

While the research is far from complete, that which has been done to date paints a very compelling picture for medical applications. Unlike THC, which bonds with CB1 and CB2 receptors within the body’s endocannabinoid system, CBD essentially suppresses “fatty acid amide hydroxylase” (FAAH), the enzyme that breaks down anandamide, a naturally occurring neurotransmitter. With less FAAH present in the body, more anandamide exists, empowering your own immune system to fight various medical conditions.

 
How do I get started?
The first thing to do when considering cannabis-based treatment is to contact your doctor to decide if this form of medicine is right for you. Many factors need to be considered including your medical history, medications and other factors best addressed by your physician.
 
When using StrainData for medicinal purposes utilize the “Symptoms” tab on the homepage to match your condition to those listed on our site. Finding the right ratio of CBD:THC is often cited as a crucial element creating an effective treatment plan and should be discussed with your healthcare provider. From there, you can sort by whatever factors are most relevant to you including: Product Type, Level of Testing, Provider and more.

Cannabinoids

The cannabis plant has been shown to alleviate a number of medical symptoms including headaches, nausea and pain. At CannLabs, we are dedicated to supporting the medical applications of cannabinoids through careful research and testing.

Cannabinoids are a group of various chemical compounds found in the cannabis plant which act on the receptors located on cells which repress the release of certain neurotransmitters in the brain. Different strains of the plant offer varying levels of cannabinoid and affect dosing when used for medicinal purposes.

 



When found in nature, cannabinoids are present in the form of sticky resinous structures known as glandular trichomes. A single trichome gland will contain a variety of cannabinoids, and recent research has shown that these cannabinoids work together to produce their medical benefits.



This phenomenon has been called the "entourage effect" because it shows that a diverse variety of cannabinoids, in precise ratios, has a more significant medical benefit than an isolated single cannabinoid synthesized in a lab.

 
Know your Cannabinoids

THC (Tetrahydrocannabinol) is the best-known cannabinoid and is the primary psychoactive compound. It has also been found to be neuroprotective with analgesic (pain relieving) effects.



CBD (Cannabidiol) is where many of the medical benefits are attributed to cannabis and has resulted in many strains being 'enriched' to increase their CBD content. CBD is not psychoactive.



CBN (Cannabinol) is also non-psychoactive and is generally attributed with a sedative effect. The typical amount of CBN found in most samples of cannabis is less than 1%.



THCA (Tetrahydrocannabinolic Acid) is the most prominent compound in fresh, undried cannabis. While the compound does not have psychoactive effects in its own right, it does have anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective effects.



THCV (Tetrahydrocannabivarin) is commonly believed to be an appetite suppressant. In addition, recent research suggests that this compound may be helpful in treating metabolic disorders including diabetes.



CBG (Cannabigerol) is a non-physcoactive cannabinoid and early results suggest it plays an important role in fighting glaucoma symptoms, inflamed bowels and potentially as treatment for bacterial infections like MRSA.



CBC (Cannabichromene) is perhaps the least understood cannabinoid, but potentially among the most important. It is believed to stimulate bone growth, as well has inhibit inflammation and pain.



CBDA (Cannabidiolic Acid) is a non-psychoactive cannabinoid believed to have anti-inflammatory properties. The compound is also thought to offer benefits when dealing with nausea and vomiting.



CBDV (Cannabidivarin) has been a relatively ignored cannabinoid until recently where many researchers believe that it may offer another option for the treatment of epilepsy.

Medical Use

Know which cannabinoids to look for to treat your symptoms. The interactive chart below is a great place to start in understanding how cannabinoids interact with your body to help treat specific conditions. To learn more about CBD strains and cannabinoids, visit our knowledge center.